A World without Antibiotics – Is this our Future?

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A World without Antibiotics – Is this our Future?

Superbugs at the Olympics
Did you know:

  • that scientists have not discovered any new antibiotics for the past 30 years?
  • that multidrug-resistant bacteria (superbugs) kill more than 9,000 Australians each year?
  • that by 2030, more than 16,000 people will die each year — that’s more than 300 each week!!
http://superbugs.imb.uq.edu.au/

Bringing this frightening future much closer to home, superbug-infested waters were an issue that surrounded the Olympic Games in Rio this year. What did this mean for our Australian athletes?

If you are interested and would like to find out more, this free event is one you should not miss!

At this event, you will hear personal stories of athletes and the challenges doctors faced when treating the athletes who entered the superbug-infested waters in Rio.

Register now for this free community event and hear from:

This exciting expert panel will also include UQ researchers, who will discuss measures taken to prevent superbugs from taking a stronghold at the Olympic Games.

Where:  UQ Institute for Molecular Bioscience Auditorium

When:   5.30-7.30pm Thursday night 17 November

This event has been organised by Mathilde Desselle, from the UQ Community of Open Access Drug Discovery (CO-ADD). In August this year she gave a presentation at our TEDxYouth@BGS event, focusing on the race to find new antibiotics. The premise of her talk was that “the threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues to rise, but the number of new treatments available has flatlined, and this has placed us dangerously close to a return to the pre-antibiotic era, when even simple infections caused death.” (http://www.co-add.org)  However, the CO-ADD mission is to help researchers worldwide to find new, diverse compounds to combat drug-resistant infections by testing, free of charge, thousands of chemical compounds which might otherwise be thrown in the bin.

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